Clothing Business – RN Squared http://rnsquared.com/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 23:14:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rnsquared.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-8-150x150.png Clothing Business – RN Squared http://rnsquared.com/ 32 32 Rent the Runway enters the $ 33 billion fashion resale market https://rnsquared.com/rent-the-runway-enters-the-33-billion-fashion-resale-market/ https://rnsquared.com/rent-the-runway-enters-the-33-billion-fashion-resale-market/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/rent-the-runway-enters-the-33-billion-fashion-resale-market/ Jennifer Hyman, Rent the Runway Scott Mlyn | CNBC Rent the Runway announced on Wednesday that it is expanding into resale, a major development for the fashion rental platform. In addition to renting, customers will soon be able to buy used designer clothes in the store. No membership is required as Rent the Runway aims […]]]>

Jennifer Hyman, Rent the Runway

Scott Mlyn | CNBC

Rent the Runway announced on Wednesday that it is expanding into resale, a major development for the fashion rental platform.

In addition to renting, customers will soon be able to buy used designer clothes in the store. No membership is required as Rent the Runway aims to expand its reach and provide buyers with more viable entry points. Previously, only paying members could purchase used Rebecca Minkoff dresses, Tory Burch tops, and even Lululemon leggings at a discount at Rent the Runway.

The launch comes as Rent the Runway retreats from the effects of the Covid pandemic. When Americans were forced to stay home for months, they quickly cut back on spending on outfits for the office, vacation, wedding, and other special occasion. Rent the Runway was forced to cut costs, close all retail stores, and lay off employees. Last September, the company revised its subscription plans in another shift, discontinued its unlimited option and switched to simplified plans with four, eight and 16 elements.

The company said entering the resale market “provides another engine for growth and a broader delivery of our value proposition.” It added that, compared to 15 months ago, it found twice as many customers who themselves report coming to Rent the Runway for sustainable fashion solutions.

With the introduction, Rent the Runway positions itself as a closer competitor to already established resale marketplaces such as Poshmark, ThredUp, The RealReal and StockX. The latter, known for landing coveted sneakers, is expected to go public this year. The ecommerce marketplace Etsy announced on Wednesday that it was buying the second-hand fashion app Depop for $ 1.62 billion.

The total U.S. resale market will be worth more than $ 33 billion by the end of this year and is well on its way to surpass $ 64 billion by 2024, according to GlobalData.

Analysts say frugality on clothing, accessories, and housewares could be an even more compelling value proposition out of the health crisis, especially as Americans try to clean up their closets to make room for new styles, possibly in new sizes.

“We believe we can get more people to do thrift shopping,” said Chief Executive Officer Jenn Hyman in an interview. “And from there, once they have the experience of buying something from us and seeing the quality, a lot of those people end up being converted into rent.”

While Rent The Runway has closed its retail stores due to the pandemic, it still has a network of drop-off points in major cities, including New York.

Shannon Stapleton | Reuters

After a rocky year, Rent the Runway said customers are returning to their app, showing signs that they want to dress up again for brunches, birthday dinners, baby showers, and bachelorette parties.

In particular, people want to show a little skin when they leave the house. Rent the Runway stated that demand for crop tops this year was four times as high as it was all of 2019. This doesn’t just apply to younger customers. The demand for tight tops by women over 35 years of age is three times as high as in 2019.

In the US, searches for items with clippings increased 44%. And deliveries of short mini dresses have doubled over two years, the company said.

Rent the Runway is also seeing what is known as unprecedented membership growth in second and third tier markets – including Nashville, Tennessee; Charleston, South Carolina and Charlotte, North Carolina. In even smaller cities – including Chapel Hill, North Carolina – membership growth is 50% faster than the major subways.

In the New York metropolitan area, Rent the Runway said the average number of new subscribers each day in May was four and a half times higher than it was in February. And traditional pillars for the company in the south – including Texas, Florida and Georgia – have almost returned to pre-pandemic membership, it said.

“People wear their optimism on their bodies,” said Hyman. “They are showing the world that they are happy … and they are ready to celebrate. Everyone expresses their joy through their clothes. And that’s really exciting for our business, but it’s also very exciting for the fashion industry. “

Nuuly, a fashion subscription platform that launched Urban Outfitters in 2019, sees similar promising trends across its business.

Website traffic and rentals were up 25% in April versus March, Nuuly said, with dresses accounting for 32% of items rented, up from 18% in April last year.

“The vaccine is coming, spring has started and I think consumers are generally very optimistic right now,” said Nuuly President Dave Hayne. “It shows in our business.”

Now more and more retail brands are experimenting in this area. Ralph Lauren started his own rental service called The Lauren Look in March. Lululemon has also started piloting a resale program with the help of technology start-up Trove.

“Online resale is a small but rapidly growing market,” Jefferies analyst Janine Stichter said in a customer note.

Retailers should find a way to get into reselling if they haven’t already, either through partnerships or by launching their own platforms. The top three reasons for this are: growing consumer awareness of sustainability and garment waste, their growing importance to investors, and the opportunity for profitability, according to Stichter.

“Both consumers and investors are increasingly focusing on the enormous environmental impact of clothing waste, and resale is a solution for companies and consumers who want to reduce the environmental impact of clothing,” said Stichter.

Last fall, Rent the Runway raised another round of funding valued at $ 750 million, losing the multi-billion dollar unicorn status it cemented in 2019. The company has raised approximately $ 400 million to date. Last week she appointed actress and Goop founder Gwyneth Paltrow to her board of directors.

Details on the start of the resale of Rent the Runway can be found here.

Rent the runway is a quintuple CNBC disruptor 50 Company, last 5th place on the 2019 list. SIGN UP for our weekly original newsletter that goes beyond the list and offers a closer look at CNBC Disruptor 50’s companies and the founders who continue to innovate in all areas of the economy.

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Fashion Resale Site Sellpy Expands to 20 New Markets with H&M Support – Sourcing Journal https://rnsquared.com/fashion-resale-site-sellpy-expands-to-20-new-markets-with-hm-support-sourcing-journal/ https://rnsquared.com/fashion-resale-site-sellpy-expands-to-20-new-markets-with-hm-support-sourcing-journal/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/fashion-resale-site-sellpy-expands-to-20-new-markets-with-hm-support-sourcing-journal/ The H&M Group and the online second-hand clothing store Sellpy are becoming increasingly intertwined as the days go by. The fast fashion giant continues to invest in the Swedish resale platform, this time by providing the logistical support to support expansion into 20 more European countries including Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France and […]]]>

The H&M Group and the online second-hand clothing store Sellpy are becoming increasingly intertwined as the days go by.

The fast fashion giant continues to invest in the Swedish resale platform, this time by providing the logistical support to support expansion into 20 more European countries including Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France and others. The new investment extends Sellpy’s online presence to a total of 24 countries through a new website, sellpy.com. Currently, the new markets can only buy goods from the platform and cannot yet use their sales function.

Users with access to all of the platform’s features can order a bag for 1.95 euros ($ 2.36), wrap it up with the items they want to sell, and send it back to Sellpy. From there, the company lists every item it can sell, sets a price, and takes care of the post-sale logistics. In order to maintain a certain standard of quality, Sellpy urges sellers to only include items that can be sold for more than 5 euros and to refrain from shipping clothing from cheap brands. It recommends labels like Nike, & Other Stories, Monki, Ralph Lauren, and Filippa K.

The partnership offers advantages for both sides, but especially for the startup, which can now benefit from H & M’s global presence and finely tuned infrastructure. A strategic partnership with the global supply chain of the H&M Group gives Sellpy logistical support and access to a modern storage unit in Poznań, Poland. All processes related to Sellpy’s sales service and e-commerce for used items – including distribution, garment quality control and order processing – are carried out by the H&M Group’s Eastern Europe logistics team.

The H&M Group began investing in the resale business in 2015 and became majority owner. Sellpy expanded into Germany in 2020, followed by the Netherlands and Austria earlier this year. The two companies have since explored further synergies. In 2019, the H&M Group’s & Other Stories brand launched a test pilot program of a program that allowed users to purchase used clothing through the & Other Stories brand’s website and commissioned Sellpy to build its sales platform.

To date, H&M has invested 20 million euros ($ 24.38 million) and owns around 70 percent of the company, according to Reuters.

Sellpy is now the second largest online shop and sales service for used items in Sweden.

“We are delighted with Sellpy’s continued international expansion, which we support with our strategic partnership and as owners,” said Nanna Andersen, Head of H&M CO: LAB, the investment arm of the H&M Group. “We always strive to offer our portfolio companies added value in order to support them in realizing their ambitions.”

Both companies focus their efforts on keeping fashion on the move longer.

The $ 50 billion resale market price makes now a good time for Sellpy’s global expansion. In April, the Berlin e-commerce giant Zalando followed suit and expanded its resale platform to seven new markets, including Austria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Italy and Sweden.

The segment’s success has also inspired other e-commerce companies to move into reselling. This month, Etsy signed a $ 1.625 billion deal to buy resale startup Depop and unite both peer-to-peer marketplaces. Online personal stylist service and retailer Stitch Fix also announced an investment in an upcoming “show-like model” during a recent conference call.

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How a small company advocated gender-equitable clothing https://rnsquared.com/how-a-small-company-advocated-gender-equitable-clothing/ https://rnsquared.com/how-a-small-company-advocated-gender-equitable-clothing/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/how-a-small-company-advocated-gender-equitable-clothing/ Entrepreneur E Leifer wants a stylish world in which gender no longer plays a role in how we dress or wear. After two decades in the fashion industry, Leifer co-founded Play Out Apparel, acted as chief design officer and shaped the future of “gender-sensitive clothing”. Mission-driven beyond their product lines, Leifer and his team strive […]]]>

Entrepreneur E Leifer wants a stylish world in which gender no longer plays a role in how we dress or wear. After two decades in the fashion industry, Leifer co-founded Play Out Apparel, acted as chief design officer and shaped the future of “gender-sensitive clothing”. Mission-driven beyond their product lines, Leifer and his team strive to be intersectional in the communities they nurture and have made a goal since day one to donate 20% of their net profits to Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ + nonprofits .

Like most companies, Play Out Apparel took a hit in March 2020 when the pandemic crippled most of the world. As clothing production and orders came to a standstill, Leifer and Co. had to rethink their business methods and re-prioritize their importance to them. Bustle recently spoke to Leifer about what it was like to run her own clothing line in a turbulent year, what inspires her, and how Play Out Apparel got back into business thanks to the brand’s extremely loyal customer base.

Why are you doing the work that you are doing?

I come from a long career in the fashion industry and have seen how this industry excludes, marginalizes and belittles people who just have stylish clothing in a wide range of sizes and want to see themselves represented in advertising. People don’t want to feel like they have to be “someone else” to wear a certain brand. I buy in my assets and see my expenses as a means of power. Play Out Apparel is a company that doesn’t make “other” people. We have built a company that essentially stands for equality, representation and individuality. Fulfilling this need drives me as a person and designer, and that drives our founder and CEO Abby Sugar as well.

What was it like doing business before vs. during the pandemic?

The biggest difference before the pandemic was that we could be “hands-on” with our customers and our brand advertising. We could do “pop-up” shops, personal events in stores selling our products, and we even had a beach volleyball team that we sponsored every summer. Product shoots with models coming together and interacting are also very important to us and that was put on hold during the pandemic. So we had to be creative in how we communicate products on our websites and on social media.

Were there any “light bulb moments” during Covid-19 due to the challenges you faced as a small fashion business owner?

Since we as a small company were physically separated from each other during the shelter-in-place and could not order or receive any new products, we have rethought, reinvented and rescheduled our entire marketing and production channels for 2020. This year we took what we learned and realized that we can “move up” in the future. We saw that we could be more agile in terms of employee locations and team communication, and we built in apps that gave us the flexibility to source all sorts of content from around the world.

How did you maintain a positive and productive perspective over the past year?

We have always been committed to agility as a team and as a company, but we never thought it would be as practical as it was in 2020. We knew early on that we had to keep rolling with the beat and stay true to our long-term vision, no matter what happens. We thought if we could get through this, we could get through almost anything. We took every victory, no matter how small, and always put one foot in front of the other. Our mission to serve and support our community has also helped us a lot in staying positive.

What technologies or innovations have you used to navigate Covid-19 and beyond?

So many amazing platforms have developed in that time. We have moved our influencer relationship management to Influence.co so that we have everything in one place and access to thousands of ambassadors and influencers who align with our brand values.

We have streamed events on Twitch, hosted panels on Zoom, been on panels in the clubhouse, integrated apps into our Shopify store, really branched out on TikTok, and are constantly exploring every new platform, device, and plugin we hear about. The days when you could only rely on paid Facebook ads are obviously over and entirely new, global communities are slowly taking their place.

What were your big losses and big wins over the past year?

Our biggest loss was time, production, and delivery windows, and we didn’t have creative control over the content we relied on to sell products because we couldn’t work directly with the models on shoots. We had to reinvent the entire year that was planned for the first quarter. But in the end our victories far outweighed these losses.

We were able to launch two new collections and virtually expand our team. Above all, we were able to virtually woo our current COO – the former H&M Country Manager Mexico, John Lackner – and win him as a partner last September. It is also a great asset to know that we as a team can withstand the pressure and uncertainty that 2020 has brought with it. 2020 was a pivotal moment for our business, and the lessons we have learned about what we can overcome and advance will be carried far into the future.

What is your advice to small business owners who are still trying to get back on their feet?

Owning a business is a lot of hard work, but it’s worth it when you can see that your mission is connected to your audience. Don’t be afraid to take risks, but always think about your “why”. Remembering why you started a business will keep you energized when things are overwhelming or obstacles arise. Don’t be afraid to address yourself either. Share your mission with everyone and understand what you need so that you can connect with people and work with them to move your business forward.

This interview has been edited and shortened for the sake of clarity.

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10 Roadside Pickup Tips For Your Business https://rnsquared.com/10-roadside-pickup-tips-for-your-business/ https://rnsquared.com/10-roadside-pickup-tips-for-your-business/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/10-roadside-pickup-tips-for-your-business/ ERIE, Pa., June 16, 2021 / PRNewswire / – When the COVID-19 pandemic began in early 2020, Americans immediately looked for ways to reduce face-to-face contact. Meanwhile, companies were looking for options to keep their doors open as many faced government-ordered closures and restrictions. A new trend emerged almost overnight: roadside pick-up. Make your roadside […]]]>

ERIE, Pa., June 16, 2021 / PRNewswire / – When the COVID-19 pandemic began in early 2020, Americans immediately looked for ways to reduce face-to-face contact. Meanwhile, companies were looking for options to keep their doors open as many faced government-ordered closures and restrictions. A new trend emerged almost overnight: roadside pick-up.

While adding roadside pick-up services may require some changes for your business, there is also a distinct benefit. You can take advantage of this tremendous e-commerce opportunity without the shipping costs that often make online sales a loss leader.

Whether your business wants to add roadside pickup or just want to improve the service you already offer, Erie Insurance has 10 helpful tips.

  1. Use technology to your advantage. One reason a customer may choose to have a roadside pickup is because it’s convenient. Wonder how complicated your online checkout process is. Can customers notify you when they arrive via SMS, website or app? If customers have difficulty ordering online or have long wait times when they arrive at your store, they are unlikely to try the service again.
  2. Give clear instructions. There is no real standard for how roadside pickup should work. The practice varies from company to company and from location to location. This is why it is important to give your customers clear instructions both before and during the pickup. Make sure the process is explained clearly and simply on your website as well as in your company.
  3. Limit personal contact. Another reason to offer a roadside pick-up service is to reduce the amount of contact your customers (and employees) have with others. So make sure your employees are well trained and follow physical distancing guidelines. You should also adjust your pick-up processes to reduce face-to-face contact.
  4. Provide protective clothing. By now we all know the importance of wearing masks to contain the spread of COVID-19. But you should also consider other items of clothing in order to protect your employees. Wearing brightly colored reflective vests can help drivers recognize their employees in crowded parking lots. Proper footwear, such as non-slip shoes, can prevent slips and falls. And in the cold winter months, warm clothing such as hats, coats and gloves is required.
  5. Clearly name your pick-up area. Set a number of parking spaces in your parking lot or along the curb outside your building as the curb pickup location. Then make sure the area is well lit and clearly marked.
  6. Follow hygiene best practices. Make sure that routine cleaning is part of your roadside collection process and follow the latest directions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you work in the restaurant or grocery store, this tip also applies to the correct temperature of the food. Make sure you follow federal food safety guidelines by properly storing both hot and cold food while orders wait to be picked up.
  7. Improve sidewalk safety. As employees pace back and forth to deliver customer orders, your sidewalks become additional traffic. Reduce slips, trips and falls by keeping sidewalks clutter free and eliminating all slip hazards – especially snow and ice. If you have potholes in your parking lot or damaged parts of your sidewalk, you should get them repaired. And also use entrance mats and wet floor signs.
  8. Check your insurance coverage. As you expand your service offering, it is always a good idea to contact your insurance agent. Your agent can review your business insurance policy to make sure you are adequately covered in the event of a breach or litigation.
  9. Promote your new roadside pickup Roadside pickup won’t increase sales if your customers don’t know about it. To promote this new service, think of all the ways you can reach buyers with the news. Some options can include print and digital advertising, social media marketing, email distribution, and in-store signage.
  10. Focus on customer service. Just because no roadside customer walks into your store doesn’t mean you can’t personalize the experience. Make sure your reps get the most out of their brief customer interactions by being friendly and greeting the customer by name. Consider including a personal note or coupon with your order. Check each order for accuracy and try to deliver it as quickly and efficiently as possible. After the customer leaves, you might even want to send an email or text message to thank you for their business. `

Every business is unique. For this reason, we do not offer a single policy or an inflexible policy. Her ERIE agent listens to you carefully and reacts with tailor-made solutions for your company – and your budget. To learn more about how a ERIE Business insurance can help protect you, contact one ERIE Agent in your area today.

About the Erie insurance
According to AM Best Company, Erie Insurance Group based in Erie, Pennsylvania, is the eleventh largest homeowner insurer and the twelfth largest auto insurer in the United States by direct premium written and the 16th largest property / casualty insurer in the United States by total net written premiums. Rated A + (Superior) by AM Best Company, the group has nearly 6 million policies in place and operates in 12 states and the District of Columbia. The Erie Insurance Group is a FORTUNE 500 company.

Press releases and additional information about the Erie Insurance Group are available at www.erieinsurance.com.

SOURCE Erie insurance group

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This company beat the odds https://rnsquared.com/this-company-beat-the-odds/ https://rnsquared.com/this-company-beat-the-odds/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/this-company-beat-the-odds/ As the pandemic raged through the first few months of 2020, U.S. black business ownership plummeted more than 40 percent, the biggest drop in any demographic, according to the House of Representatives Small Business Committee. Among the many impacts disproportionately affecting small businesses, black business owners were less likely to have the tools to deal […]]]>

As the pandemic raged through the first few months of 2020, U.S. black business ownership plummeted more than 40 percent, the biggest drop in any demographic, according to the House of Representatives Small Business Committee. Among the many impacts disproportionately affecting small businesses, black business owners were less likely to have the tools to deal with mandatory closings, largely due to a lack of access to financial facilities like emergency loans that would otherwise give them a lifeline.

One of those companies that had to climb fast was Our boutique for favorite things, a company that is committed to fair trade and presents beautiful, beautiful clothing for all body shapes and sizes. Employees at the company’s two locations in Cleveland, Ohio enable customers “to look, feel, and be absolutely amazing with wearable art regardless of size,” said Dr. Lisa McGuthry, owner of Our Favorite Things, told TriplePundit.

Our Favorite Things boutique has two locations in Cleveland, Ohio.

Dr. McGuthry added, “Our clothes are comfortable, stylish and bohemian chic.” In early 2020, she had bold plans for her business to take it to the next level, such as selling in open-air markets and opening pop-up -Shops.

Then COVID-19 arrived. “As a retail boutique, we weren’t a major company, but that didn’t stop us,” continued Dr. McGuthry gone. “We created The QVC in The CLE via Facebook Live, two weeks after the pandemic broke out.”

Despite the initial difficulties, Our Favorite Things has grown. “We have gained access to 43 percent more customers and our loyal regular customers,” added Dr. McGuthry added. “We ship fair trade clothing and accessories all over the United States to Alaska and the Netherlands.”

The stores also became a lifeline for local designers as Our Favorite Things has well over a dozen products from entrepreneurs in its stores to date.

Editor’s note: Be sure to subscribe to our Brands Taking Stands Newsletter, which appears every Wednesday.

To Dr. McGuthry’s courage, determination, and creativity came with the support of SCORE, a nonprofit that describes itself as the largest network of volunteer mentors for small businesses in the United States. Through an arrangement with the US Small Business Administration (SBA), the organization also runs programs for women entrepreneurs, operates a small business resilience center, and acts as a clearinghouse for updates to SBA funding.

Dr. McGuthry had previously worked with SCORE, which had assigned her a board of directors so she could find ways to grow her business.

That relationship only got stronger when the pandemic was in full swing. “My advisory board at SCORE was great,” said Dr. McGuthry. “I remember why I started my journey: it’s definitely not easy, but it’s worth it. The effect of giving back to my community and providing the quality products that are needed and inspiring people is what business is about. Due to our increase in sales and deliveries, we were able to hire more employees. I am grateful to my advisory board that they are available to answer questions and concerns. “

Dr.  Lisa McGuthry, the "Social preneur" behind Our Favorite Things Boutique
Dr. Lisa McGuthry, the “social preneur” behind Our Favorite Things Boutique.

Part of that return was for new products. For example, our favorites found new opportunities in self-care and other products, such as the sale of masks and disinfectants. The company went out of its way to help others by giving such products to those who couldn’t afford them or who worked on the front lines. The stores also offered shipping options as well as on-site contactless delivery. And because of these efforts, as part of the QVC in The CLE, the company stayed afloat while helping to build a community.

Despite her successes, Dr. McGuthry frustration with the broader system. “I am still frustrated that we did not receive an EIDL [an Economic Injury Disaster Loan from the SBA] or ahead. We have private services that helped us through the Cleveland Growth Collaborative, but not federal aid, ”she explained. “The money didn’t get into the hands of the companies that needed it most. I won’t give up or give in. Entrepreneurship has taught me that you can find out what you’ve put in. “

In contrast to other companies that couldn’t turn around in time, Our Favorite Things has become a success story – but one that has developed despite the system, not because of it. “Today we are growing continuously as a company and building a community. I appealed our SBA loan decision and was denied again, ”said Dr. McGuthry. “There are no concrete reasons, but as an entrepreneur I am resilient, as is our team, and we will continue the growth process: learn from our mistakes and strive every day to become better for ourselves and our customers.”

Photo credit: Our Favorite Things Boutique / Facebook

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Lindsay companies cut ties to the COVID effect https://rnsquared.com/lindsay-companies-cut-ties-to-the-covid-effect/ https://rnsquared.com/lindsay-companies-cut-ties-to-the-covid-effect/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/lindsay-companies-cut-ties-to-the-covid-effect/ The clothing boutique sells wedding, first communion and christening dresses, but specializes in quinceanera dresses. Loya says her store is the only one in the Central Valley that carries designs from Perfect Dress, a clothing company based in Guadalajara, Mexico that is known throughout Mexico. Under the slogan “designing your dream”, the company offers handmade […]]]>

The clothing boutique sells wedding, first communion and christening dresses, but specializes in quinceanera dresses. Loya says her store is the only one in the Central Valley that carries designs from Perfect Dress, a clothing company based in Guadalajara, Mexico that is known throughout Mexico. Under the slogan “designing your dream”, the company offers handmade dresses with fine fabrics and exclusive cuts that suit both modern and classic personalities. Please visit prefectdress15.com.mx for more information.

“They only make quinceanera dresses and they are beautiful and unique,” said Loya.

Virginia’s Hair Studio & Boutique is located at 275 N. Elmwood Ave. in Lindsay, but has separate entrances at the front of the building. The salon is only open by appointment, but the clothing boutique is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Loya said she dedicates every Saturday at the hair salon to weddings, quinceaneras, anniversaries, and other special occasions. For more information about the stores, call 559-562-3200.

Some may take the same-based companies as a sign of tough times, but Loya said opening the clothing store required hiring an employee, the first time she had done so in nearly two years.

“I was able to stay open and really haven’t seen a lot of stores closed in the past year,” Loya said. “Yes, they struggled, but most of them were able to stay open.”

Loya is also the director of Lindsay’s Chamber of Commerce and said she has opened other stores in town recently. Late last month the chamber held a band parade for El Rincon del Sabor, a Mexican restaurant whose name translates to “The Flavor Corner”. The restaurant is located on 246 N. Elmwood Avenue behind the Dollar General. Loya said the owners have been selling groceries at the Swap Meet in Strathmore for several years but are now trying to own a restaurant.

There may be two more ribbon cuts on the Chamber’s calendar this month. A cell phone store on the corner of Samoa and Elmwood said they were interested in planning a tape cut, and Loya said she recently contacted a thrift store that opened six months ago and is now ready to serve more customers to greet.

“We had three stores open in the last month and I can see things get going again,” she said.

Since opening her hair salon in 1990, Loya has seen the ups and downs of the Lindsay Chamber. When Loya joined the Chamber as a volunteer in 2004, it seemed like things would never get better. She took on a bigger leadership role later that year when Carolyn Callison, who served as executive director for seven years, took medical hiatus. That year, Loya watched the Chamber lose funds from the city, lose its accountant, watch its board flip as it tried to get a huge new project off the ground at the Friday Night Market. But this project turned out to be a boon for the Chamber.

The city took the market away from the Chamber in 2019 and outsourced it to a group from Selma. While most of the organization would have washed their hands, Loya continued to trim hair in her parlor, answer phone calls, and wait for the right moment to rebuild the chamber.

“I see more people out there, restaurants reopening and new businesses,” Loya said. “I also think a lot of people are waiting for June 15th, but then they’ll be full steam ahead.”

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Brooklyn Nets star becomes director of Saks’ online business https://rnsquared.com/brooklyn-nets-star-becomes-director-of-saks-online-business/ https://rnsquared.com/brooklyn-nets-star-becomes-director-of-saks-online-business/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/brooklyn-nets-star-becomes-director-of-saks-online-business/ Three-time NBA scoring champion James Harden is known for his leadership and decision-making skills on the court. Now he has the chance to use these qualities off the pitch. The Guardian of the Brooklyn Nets has been named to the board of directors of the new Saks e-commerce store in Saks Fifth Avenue Department Stores. […]]]>
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Inflation for goods is making local businesses feel the effects https://rnsquared.com/inflation-for-goods-is-making-local-businesses-feel-the-effects/ https://rnsquared.com/inflation-for-goods-is-making-local-businesses-feel-the-effects/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/inflation-for-goods-is-making-local-businesses-feel-the-effects/ Price increases are getting harder and harder to ignore. Inflation has risen 5 percent since last year, the fastest pace in nearly 13 years. This affects almost all items on the market, including clothing and furniture. “For example, t-shirts are $ 2, but that’s $ 4 for the consumer,” said Passport owner Chris Limon. Couch […]]]>

Price increases are getting harder and harder to ignore.

Inflation has risen 5 percent since last year, the fastest pace in nearly 13 years. This affects almost all items on the market, including clothing and furniture.

“For example, t-shirts are $ 2, but that’s $ 4 for the consumer,” said Passport owner Chris Limon.

Couch Potato partner Lee Samways added, “The combination of raw materials and shipping prices has increased everywhere. So they actually charge us 12-15 percent more just to get the product delivered. “

Manufacturers across the country have stopped production because of the coronavirus. Now local businesses are seeing prices rise in a variety of sectors due to increased demand and shortages of manpower and materials.

Limon says customers are willing to pay more for clothes after the pandemic, although costs are rising.

“We make sure we offer quality customer service, so we want to support these prices,” said Limon.

Men’s clothing is up 3 percent, shoes by 8 percent.

In the meantime, some high-demand big ticket items have seen dramatic spikes. Furniture has increased by almost 9 percent.

At Couch Potato, owners say more people moved to the Central Coast during the pandemic, increasing demand for furniture. But they try to keep the prices the same.

“We should actually change our price tags almost every other week. But we still have some of our same price tags from last year. To support our local economy, we don’t say no to our customers, ”said Couch Potato CEO Guntur Yilmaz.

The rise in furniture prices is also influenced by surcharges that increase import prices.

“At the moment there is a great demand for many overseas products because they are always the cheapest. But these are the hardest to come by right now, ”said Samways.

Even so, the local owners say they continue to feel supported by the community.

“Just when people found out we were a small company, they wanted to support it,” Limon said.

And economists say not to worry. They expect many of these jaw-dropping price hikes to be short-lived as the economy adjusts and last year comparisons become less dramatic.

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Social Justice T-Shirt Company Opens New Store in Portland https://rnsquared.com/social-justice-t-shirt-company-opens-new-store-in-portland/ https://rnsquared.com/social-justice-t-shirt-company-opens-new-store-in-portland/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/social-justice-t-shirt-company-opens-new-store-in-portland/ A Portland clothing company that sells social justice t-shirts has opened its first brick and mortar store in downtown Portland. Mimi’s Fresh Tees owner Kamelah Adams started making and selling t-shirts online in 2018 after she said a substitute teacher at her son’s school accused him of beating another child and refused to believe him […]]]>

A Portland clothing company that sells social justice t-shirts has opened its first brick and mortar store in downtown Portland.

Mimi’s Fresh Tees owner Kamelah Adams started making and selling t-shirts online in 2018 after she said a substitute teacher at her son’s school accused him of beating another child and refused to believe him when the boy said a white classmate was responsible.

“I saw the need for people in the community, especially blacks and browns, to be able to express their feelings without saying a word,” Adams told The Oregonian / OregonLive.com on Sunday. “That’s why I use my shirts as a billboard.”

Her first design was a cream colored t-shirt with an outline of Africa around the message “Black history didn’t start with slavery”.

The company now has its own store at 123 NW Second Ave., Suite 420 in Portland’s Old Town Chinatown. Mimi’s Fresh Tees celebrated its grand opening on Saturday and will open again to walk-in customers on Tuesday. Roadside collection and online ordering are available through mimisfreshteespdx.com.

“In retail, you have to turn around,” said Adams. “And I’ve seen a decline in my online sales since the beginning of the year, especially last month. I think it’s because people go to the markets more, they’re not on their devices that much, which is nice. We want this connection again. “

Slow sales nearly closed Mimi’s Fresh Tees in the early days of the pandemic. That changed in May when thousands of Portlanders marched in protest against systemic racism and police brutality after a Minneapolis police officer murdered George Floyd. Instead of wearing a sign, Mimi’s Fresh Tees allowed protesters who wanted to draw attention to implicit bias to wear their messages on their sleeves. Soon the company’s shirts, including a “Unity” T-shirt with a fist made of words like “justice,” “fairness,” and “opportunity,” were a familiar sight during protests.

Mimi’s Fresh Tees also caught the interest of the Portland Thorns, who helped Adams secure a $ 25,000 grant after beating long-time rival OL Reign in the National Women’s Soccer League Fall Series final last fall.

“That’s pretty much the only reason I got the store open,” said Adams of the scholarship, noting that customers have encouraged them to take the stationary plunge. “I just saw an Instagram message this morning someone asked if they could go shopping at the store.”

– Michael Russell, mrussell@oregonian.com, @tdmrussell

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Cherry Creek North has seen an increase in pedestrian traffic in the past few months – CBS Denver https://rnsquared.com/cherry-creek-north-has-seen-an-increase-in-pedestrian-traffic-in-the-past-few-months-cbs-denver/ Thu, 17 Jun 2021 02:07:56 +0000 https://rnsquared.com/cherry-creek-north-has-seen-an-increase-in-pedestrian-traffic-in-the-past-few-months-cbs-denver/ DENVER (CBS4) – Colorado is making its comeback, and Cherry Creek North is the newest area in the Denver metro to see positive changes. Jeannie McFarland Johnson, Director of Marketing and Communications for Cherry Creek North Business Improvement District, shared the data through a Zoom call with Mekialaya White from CBS4. (Credit: CBS) CONTINUE READING: […]]]>
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